JA Medicare

ILA offers the right treatment with the appropriate budget for those who will come abroad for treatment. Upon patient request, All of his/her travel preparations will be taken successfully by our expert travel consultants starting from his/her place of residence until returning home.

Our commitment is based on professionalism. This is the most important aspect when we perform dental care. We respect the strictest hygiene protocols and all treatments are performed in top quality. The guarantee of our commitment is the experience and dedication of our dentists and the entire team involved in your dental treatments and the high level equipment of the clinic.

Hair transplants are done to add more hair to an area on your head that may be thinning or balding. It’s done by taking hair from thicker parts of the scalp, or other parts of the body, and grafting it to the thinning or balding section of the scalp.

Worldwide, about 60 percent of men and 50 percent of women experience some form of hair loss. To address this, people often use over-the-counter products, including topical treatments like minoxidil (Rogaine).

Hair transplant is another restoration method. The first transplant was performed in 1939 in Japan with single scalp hairs. In the following decades, physicians developed the “plug” technique. This involves transplanting large tufts of hair.

Over time, surgeons began using mini- and micro-grafts to minimize the appearance of transplanted hair on the scalp.

Do hair transplants work?

Hair transplants are typically more successful than over-the-counter hair restoration products. But there are some factors to consider:

Anywhere from 10 to 80 percent of transplanted hair will fully grow back in an estimated three to four months.
Like regular hair, transplanted hair will thin over time.
People with dormant hair follicles (sacs that usually contain hair beneath the skin but no longer grow hair) may have less effective transplants, but a 2016 study suggests that plasma therapy can help up to 75 percent or more of the transplanted hairs fully grow back.
Hair transplants don’t work for everyone. They’re mainly used to restore hair if you’re balding or thinning naturally or have lost hair due to an injury.

Most transplants are done with your existing hair, so they’re not as effective for treating people with:

  • widespread thinning and baldness
  • hair loss due to chemotherapy or other medications
  • thick scalp scars from injuries

Recovery

FUT and FUE may each take several hours to several days to complete. In part, this depends on the amount of work performed by the surgeon. You will go home the same day of the procedure.

Once the surgery is done, your surgeon carefully removes any bandages. The area may be swollen, so your surgeon might inject triamcinolone into the area to keep the swelling down.

You’ll likely feel pain or soreness at the transplant site as well as in the area where hair was taken from. For the next few days, your surgeon may prescribe:

  • pain medications, such as ibuprofen (Advil)
  • antibiotics to prevent infections
  • anti-inflammatories, such as an oral steroid, to relieve swelling
  • medications such as finasteride (Propecia) or minoxidil (Rogaine) to help stimulate hair growth

Here are some aftercare tips for hair transplant surgery:

  • Wait a few days after the surgery to wash your hair. Only use mild shampoos for the first few weeks.
  • You should be able to return to work or normal activities in about 3 days.
  • Don’t press a brush or comb down over the new grafts for about 3 weeks.
  • Don’t wear any hats or pullover shirts and jackets until your doctor say it’s OK.
  • Don’t exercise for about a week.

Don’t worry if some hairs fall out. This is part of the process. Transplanted hair may not grow much or seamlessly match the hair around it for a few months.

Also known as refractive surgery, this procedure corrects focusing problems by reshaping the cornea (the transparent ‘window’ at the front of the eye) with a laser. The most common use for laser eye surgery is for the correction of shortsightedness, also known as myopia. It is also used in the treatment of long-sightedness and mild astigmatism.

Is it safe?

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) produces guidance on whether procedures are safe enough or indeed successful enough to be used routinely in the NHS in England, Wales and Scotland. After considering the evidence for using laser treatments, they have decided that it is safe and effective enough for use in the NHS. They do recommend, however, that anyone considering laser eye surgery should make sure they thoroughly understand the benefits and risks of the surgery before proceeding, and weigh this against the advantages and disadvantages of wearing glasses or contact lenses.

Is laser eye surgery for you?

Laser eye surgery might not be an option for everyone, so you should ask your optician about the latest developments in both contact lenses and glasses technology, as well as about laser eye surgery. This will help you to choose the option that is best suited to your needs.
Surgery is typically carried out on people with short or long-sight, over the age of 18, and who have had a stable prescription for at least two years. It is not however recommended for correcting reading prescriptions, also known as presbyopia, as these prescriptions change as you get older.
Some high prescriptions are also not suitable for laser surgery, although they may be corrected via a method of non-laser eye surgery, known as clear lens exchange.